Posts Tagged ‘Barry Levinson’

Earth Day in Wisconsin, unfortunately, is pretty damn chilly, so I fully intend to celebrate by wrapping myself in a fleece blanket, heating up some cocoa, and watching several frightening eco-horror films, such as:

Day of the Animals (1977)

Director: William Girdler

Synopsis: “A battle for survival as hikers encounter a chemically imbalanced forest” (imdb.com).

Slugs: The Movie (1988)

Director: Juan Piquer Simon

Synopsis: “Killer slugs on the rampage in a rural community” (imdb.com).

The Thaw (2009)

Director: Mark A. Lewis

Synopsis: “A research expedition to the Arctic discovers that a melting polar ice cap has released a deadly prehistoric parasite” (imdb.com).

Birdemic: Shock and Terror (2010)

Director: James Nguyen

Synopsis: “A platoon of eagles and vultures attacks the residents of a small town. Many people die. It’s not known what caused the flying menace to attack. Two people manage to fight back, but will they survive Birdemic?” (imdb.com).

The Bay (2012)

Director: Barry Levinson

Synopsis: “Chaos breaks out in a small Maryland town after an ecological disaster occurs.”

Happy Earth Day, fellow horror fanatics!

The Bay, directed by Barry Levinson, was an exceptional found-footage horror movie. I am now, after watching this film, terrified of swimming in the lake because I do not want to become the next victim of the “underwater nightmare.”

Donna (Kether Donohue), a communications major, is ready to report on the Fourth of July Festivities in Claridge, Maryland when the unthinkable happens: a widespread bacterial infection begins spreading like wildfire. But after much investigation, and sorting through found footage, the audience begins to understand the real truth. Instead of an infection, mutated parasites are the culprits, and they are devouring community members right and left.

And did you know these parasites are real? The parasites are known as cymothoa exigua, or the tongue-eating louse. In The Bay, these parasites, due to pollution and a nuclear waste spill, mutated and grew to enormous lengths. (Oh, and the movie also made these parasites want to devour human flesh.)

After swimming or consuming contaminated water, your skin erupts in boils and blisters, and after a few hours, the fully grown “organism” will eat you from the inside out. (In a most graphic manner, I must add.)

I would highly recommend The Bay, and afterwards, you might think differently about jumping into a nearby lake or refreshing yourself with a cool glass of water.

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